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A half-dozen selection of Irish Short Stories

12/01/2011

 

It was one of my books for Christmas. The Granta Book of the Irish Short Story. And it was my recommended read for our book club this month.

But they’re a stubborn crowd, my book club lot. They know their own minds. What did they think of the book? 

Took a long while to get into.

Some of the stories were lousy.

There are writers  here  I like, but they have better stories than what we got in this collection.

Some of the stories had no beginning or middle or end.

These can’t be the best Irish short stories of the last century!

It was time to turn the discussion around, get it working on a more positive vein.

Well, can we talk about the stories we DID like. Let’s see if we can select a half-dozen.

This did the trick. Lots of stories were enjoyed. We got a consensus on the top half-dozen Irish short stories from the Granta selection:

Claire Keegan’s ‘Men and Women’

From the 1999 collection Antartica, this story gets going with the great opening lines, ‘My father took me places. He had artificial hips, so he needs me to open gates.’ For our discerning lot, Claire Keegan’s stories, set in her rural mythic landscapes, are a triumph of writing.

Colm Tobin’s ‘A Priest in the Family’

We admired the grit, the dignity, the self-possession of Molly, mother of the child-abuser priest. After informing her of the devastating news, Father Greenwood adds, ‘I’d say people will be very kind.’ Molly replies knowingly: ‘Well, you don’t know them, then.’

Edna O’Brien’s, Sister Imelda

It’s almost 30 years since this story first appeared and it captures the boarding school world of bacon and cabbage, tapioca pudding, ‘fairly green rhubarb jam’ and the nuns’  ‘monotonous Latin chanting, long before the birds began’.

Eugene McCabe’s ‘Music at Annahullion’

 Three siblings share a home on ‘thirty wet sour acres’ and their wretched lives are captured in words spoken in Annie’s dream: ‘I wish to God we were never born.’

Mary Lavin’s ‘Lilacs’

This piece goes back almost six decades to Mary Lavin’s collection Tales from Bective Bridge.  The images of dung and lilac counterpoint the worlds of gritty reality and class aspiration with astute precision.

William Trevor’s ‘The Dressmaker’s Child’

The last story in the Granta selection and the master does not disappoint with this world of the greasy garage, the wayside weeping statue and the strange dressmaker.

We all agreed there were enough good stories in this collection to be getting along with – even if each of us had our hate list.

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  1. 13/01/2011 at 1:25 pm

    Interesting comments from your book club there, Patricia. They sound an opinionated group, which is brilliant. It’s so boring when everyone agrees! Really looking forward to reading this anthology. Hopefully it will come out in paperback soon!

  2. 13/01/2011 at 9:49 pm

    Thanks Maire. Yes, we have a group of instinctive readers – not the slightest bit awed in responding with honesty to the cream of Irish short story writers. Interesting that out of an anthology covering almost a century of writers, Claire Keegan comes out tops. For all of us, each of her stories seems to have that special quallity that leaves you speechless when you come to the end. There were a few other stories in the anthology for me that were impressive, like Patrick Boyle’s shocking ‘Meles Vulgaris’, Gerard Donovan’s gentle ‘Visit’ and Val Mulkerns’ subtle ‘Memory and Desire’. Would be interested in your reaction when you get to read the anthology.

  1. 27/01/2011 at 6:38 pm
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